Australian court wants documents from Arizona lawsuit against Google




Photo by meneame comunicacions | Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission took Google to court earlier this year for allegedly misleading consumers about how the company uses personal data and is now asking courts for documents that have already been used by Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich in his lawsuit against the tech behemoth. 

In May, Brnovich filed a heavily redacted lawsuit alleging that Google’s data-collection processes violated Arizona’s Consumer Fraud Act. Two months later, Australia’s commission filed its own suit

This week, the ACCC’s lawyers won a motion that will make Google hand over certain documents, including emails, showing the existence of a meeting, often referred to as the “Oh Sh–” meeting, that took place after a 2018 Associated Press article revealed certain ways the company tracks users movements and the difficulties of removing those tracking permissions. 

The documents about the meeting had already been revealed in Arizona courts, along with other documents that the Australian commission is seeking for its case.  

The documents may not necessarily be used as evidence for the hearing, according to an Associated Press report on the case. The justice who ruled in favor of the ACCC noted that the Arizona case is far more broad in its scope than the case in Australia. 

The ACC is also looking to obtain documents that were previously unsealed in Arizona courts that showed that some of Google’s engineers were unaware of how to disable their location settings and found the privacy settings to be confusing. 

There are a total of 270 exhibits filed in the Arizona case, 33 of which have been made public. Brnovich is asking for a jury trial in the case. 

Jerod MacDonald-Evoy
Reporter Jerod MacDonald-Evoy joins the Arizona Mirror from the Arizona Republic, where he spent 4 years covering everything from dark money in politics to Catholic priest sexual abuse scandals. Jerod has also won awards for his documentary films which have covered issues such as religious tolerance and surveillance technology used by police. He brings strong watchdog sensibilities and creative storytelling skills to the Arizona Mirror.