Author

Jeremy Duda

Jeremy Duda

Associate Editor Jeremy Duda is a Phoenix native and began his career in journalism in 2003 after graduating from the University of Arizona. Prior to joining the Arizona Mirror, he worked at the Arizona Capitol Times, where he spent eight years covering the Governor's Office and two years as editor of the Yellow Sheet Report. Before that, he wrote for the Hobbs News-Sun of Hobbs, NM, and the Daily Herald of Provo, Utah. Jeremy is also the author of the history book “If This Be Treason: the American Rogues and Rebels Who Walked the Line Between Dissent and Betrayal.”

Ducey calls for bipartisanship in State of the State, sets stage for schisms with GOP lawmakers

By: - January 14, 2019

With the GOP facing historically narrow margins in the Legislature, Gov. Doug Ducey kicked off the 2019 legislative session with a call for bipartisanship on key issues like water, K-12 education, school safety and legislative immunity.

Ducey eyes anti-recidivism, but not justice reform

By: - January 12, 2019

Gov. Doug Ducey’s ongoing commitment to reducing Arizona’s prison population by reducing recidivism doesn’t necessarily extend to criminal justice reforms that would result in fewer incarcerations in the first place.

Ducey hopes second time’s a charm for school safety plan

By: - January 12, 2019

Gov. Doug Ducey is optimistic that his school safety plan, which fell short last year after Republican lawmakers opposed a key provision, will have better luck in 2019.

Ducey says no to GOP senator’s proposed tax hike to fund education

By: - January 11, 2019

Gov. Doug Ducey rejected a Republican senator’s call to raise Arizona’s sales tax rate to provide more funding for education. “We don’t need a tax increase. We’ve got available dollars right now. We’re going to have a nice, healthy, hearty debate about where we are going to invest and spend and save them,” Ducey told […]

The 400K AZ households getting SNAP will have benefits through February if shutdown drags on

By: - January 10, 2019

Federal funding for food stamps is set to run out at the end of January, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture has found a way to help Arizona and other states weather the storm for at least one more month if President Trump and Congress can’t reach a solution to end the ongoing government shutdown.

Rep. Fillmore’s bill to ease procurement rules on school districts might not actually do that

By: - January 10, 2019

Fillmore was unclear about what changes the bill could bring for school districts, and seemed unsure about exactly what the legislation would do.

Few voters use federal-only ballots

By: - January 9, 2019

Only a small number of people in Arizona cast federal-only ballots in the 2018 election, an option that’s available for people who don’t provide proof of citizenship when they register to vote.

Hoffman takes oath of office on children’s book

By: - January 7, 2019

Kathy Hoffman took her oath of office as Arizona’s superintendent of public instruction on a children’s book that she’s often used to help students who have limited communication skills.

Hobbs, Hoffman give Dems something to cheer about in inaugural speeches

By: - January 7, 2019

Secretary of State Katie Hobbs and Superintendent of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman planted their flags as Arizona’s first Democratic statewide elected officials in nearly a decade when they were sworn in on Monday.

Ducey says no spending sprees as he prepares for second term

By: - January 7, 2019

Gov. Doug Ducey faces a far rosier budget situation than when we he first took the oath of office four years ago, but as he was sworn in for his second term, he made clear that he plans to hold the line on spending this year.

Expungement law sought by criminal justice reformers

By: - January 3, 2019

Fresh out of prison, where he’d just finished a year-and-a-half stint in prison for stealing a relative’s car, Adam Rose walked into a Starbucks inside a grocery store in Safford to apply for a job.

Maricopa County files racketeering suit against opioid manufacturers

By: - December 27, 2018

Maricopa County has joined the ranks of government entities that are taking opioid manufacturers and distributors to court over the epidemic that is raging across the country, claiming in a new racketeering lawsuit that the crisis is the direct result of intentional disinformation and other irresponsible actions by the companies that make and sell the drugs.