Sinema votes to convict, McSally to acquit Trump in impeachment




Sen. Krysten Sinema applauds during the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives on Feb. 4, 2020. Photo by Mario Tama | Getty Images

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump has survived impeachment, but he didn’t emerge unscathed. 

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday acquitted Trump on charges that he abused his power by pressuring a foreign government to interfere in a U.S. presidential election and then obstructed a congressional investigation into his actions. 

The vote was almost entirely partisan, but Democrats scored a major political coup by winning the support of Utah Republican Sen. Mitt Romney, who was the GOP’s 2012 presidential nominee. 

Arizona’s senators split: Democrat Kyrsten Sinema voted to convict Trump and remove him from office, while Republican Martha McSally voted against removal.

Sinema told The Arizona Republic that she voted to convict Trump because he jeopardized national security to further his personal political interests.

“The facts are clear; security aid was withheld from Ukraine in an attempt to benefit the president’s political campaign. While White House attorneys claim this behavior is not serious, it is dangerous to the fundamental principles of American democracy to use the power of the federal government for personal or political gain,” she told the paper.

She also warned that future presidents would use this case as “a guide to avoid transparency and accountability to the American people,” which should be “gravely concerning” to all Americans. 

In a statement following the vote, McSally blasted the impeachment as “dangerous,” and said removing Trump would have been “deeply disruptive” to both government functions and the 2020 election.

Further, McSally defended Trump’s moves to extract a politically motivated investigation into the family of a political rival, though she conceded that the way in which he did so was “inappropriate.” 

“Even if all the House Democrats allege is accurate, even if John Bolton supports their allegations in his book, even if other negative information comes out in the future, this does not rise to anywhere near the level of throwing the president out of office or off the ballot for the first time in American history,” she said.

Both of the impeachment articles fell far short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict Trump of high crimes and misdemeanors and remove him from office. 

Article I, charging Trump with abuse of power, failed by a vote of 48-52. Romney was the only Republican to vote “guilty.” 

Article II alleging obstruction of Congress was defeated 47-53, with Romney siding with Republicans. 

“It is, therefore, ordered and adjudged that the said Donald John Trump be, and he is hereby, acquitted of the charges in said articles,” declared U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, who presided over Trump’s Senate impeachment trial. 

Trump was the third U.S. president impeached by the House; on Wednesday he also became the third president acquitted by the Senate. 

The vote comes after several months of partisan sniping over impeachment has dominated politics in Washington, but the end of the trial isn’t likely to alter the tenor on Capitol Hill. On the eve of the acquittal vote, Trump delivered a divisive State of the Union address. Following his remarks, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) publicly shredded her copy of the speech. 

Pelosi has stressed that impeachment will remain a stain on Trump’s tenure: “It is a fact when someone is impeached, they are always impeached. It cannot be erased.” 

Democrats and Republicans alike warned of the long-term damage the process has caused, although they each pointed fingers at the other side. 

“This partisan impeachment will end today, but I fear the threat to our institutions may not, because this episode is one of a symptom of something much deeper,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), accusing House Democrats of using impeachment power as a political weapon. 

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), complained that the Senate trial “wasn’t a trial by any stretch of the definition.” He and other Democrats were enraged when GOP senators voted against introducing witness testimony and additional documents into the Senate trial. 

“You cannot be on the side of this president and be on the side of truth,” Schumer said on the Senate floor ahead of the acquittal vote. 

House Democrats appear certain to continue investigations into the president. 

House Judiciary Committee Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) told reporters that he’s likely to subpoena John Bolton, Trump’s former national security adviser. Bolton reportedly wrote in a book manuscript that Trump told him he was withholding aid to Ukraine to force an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, NPR reported

Lawmakers have also been discussing efforts to censure Trump for his actions toward Ukraine, although it’s unlikely that effort would advance in the GOP-controlled Senate. 

“Censure would allow this body to unite across party lines,” Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) said this week on the Senate floor. “His behavior cannot go unchecked by the Senate.” 

Trump, emboldened by the vote, tweeted out a video that depicts him running for president indefinitely.