Statewide candidates rake in nearly $660K from PACs




Doug Ducey has raised $313,000 from politcal committees
Governor Doug Ducey speaking with supporters of Donald Trump at a campaign rally with Governor Mike Pence at the Mesa Convention Center in November 2016. Photo courtesy Gage Skidmore

This is the first part in an ongoing series that examines spending by political action committees.

Candidates can get money for their campaigns in a number of ways from a variety of sources.

One of the most common ways for candidates to get money is from political action committees, most commonly referred to as PACs.

The most common types are corporate PACs, which are tied a specific company and its employees, PACs related to broader industries and union PACs, which are funded primarily by union members.

According to campaign finance data compiled by the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office, candidates have collected more than $2.6 million from PACs thus far in the 2018 election.

The most common types are corporate PACs, which are tied a specific company and its employees, PACs related to broader industries and union PACs, which are funded primarily by union members.

Corporate PACs include committees run by Pinnacle West, which owns Arizona Public Service, Raytheon, Honeywell, Wells Fargo and Wal-Mart.

Industry-related PACs often choose to support candidates who back their policy goals. For instance, the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists of Arizona PAC aims to elect candidates who will help them pass legislation that would add “uniformity” to how the state regulates different nursing roles.

Then there are union PACs, like the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 99 PAC, that represents people who have jobs as grocery workers, custodial workers, food processors and more.

Candidates frequently tout the support of the PACs who support their campaigns. Such contributions can be used to demonstrate that a candidate is pro-business or backed by public safety workers, for instance.

Other candidates, meanwhile, forego the support of any PAC support on the grounds that they don’t want to be perceived as beholden to the company, industry or organization running the PAC.

Those candidates are often run with Clean Elections funding. In order to qualify for the public campaign funding, candidates are only able to accept small dollar donations and are barred from taking money from PACs.

Other times, candidates who don’t receive PAC contributions are funding their own campaigns.

The Arizona Mirror examined campaign finance reports to examine the support each candidate for statewide office has from PACs. Including candidates who lost in the August elections, statewide candidates have received roughly $657,000 from PACs. Nearly half of that, almost $314,000, has been raised by Gov. Doug Ducey.

Governor

Doug Ducey, Republican: Largest PAC contributions came from the Pinnacle West Capital Corporation Political Action Committee ($10,200), the Arizona Society Of Certified Public Accountants PAC ($10,000), the Salt River Valley Water Users Association Political Involvement Committee ($10,000) and the Arizona Association Of Community Managers PAC ($7,700).

David Garcia, Democrat: Largest PAC contributions came from the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 99 PAC ($10,000), the Arizona Communications Workers Association ($10,000) and the Arizona Education Association Fund For Public Education ($10,000).

Angel Torres, Green: No PAC donations.

Secretary of State

Steve Gaynor, Republican: No PAC money, as Gaynor is self-funded.

Katie Hobbs, Democrat: Largest PAC contributions from the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 99 PAC ($10,000), the Emily’s List PAC ($5,100) and the Democrat, Republican, Independent Voter Education PAC ($5,000).

Attorney General

Mark Brnovich, Republican: Largest PAC contributions donations come from the Republic Services, Inc. Employees For Better Government PACPac ($5,100), Republican Attorneys General Association of Arizona PAC ($5,100) and the Arizona Professional Firefighters PAC ($5,100).

January Contreras, Democrat: Largest PAC contributions donations coame from the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 99 PAC ($10,000), Emily’s List ($5,100) and the Latino Victory Fund PAC ($5,100).

Treasurer

Mark Manoil, Democrat: Clean Elections candidate.

Kimberly Yee, Republican: Largest PAC contributions from the Pinnacle West Capital Corporation Political Action Committee ($5,100), the Susan B. Anthony Candidate Fund ($2,500) and the Greenberg Traurig PAC ($2,500).

Superintendent of Public Instruction

Kathy Hoffman, Democrat: Clean Elections candidate.

Frank Riggs, Republican: No PAC money, as Riggs is mostly self-funded.

Mine Inspector

Joe Hart, Republican: Largest PAC contributions from the Arizona Rock Products Association Political Action Committee ($3,050), the Amigos PAC ($1,000) and the Vulcan Materials Company Political Action Committee ($250).

Bill Pierce, Democrat: Clean Elections candidate.

Corporation Commission

Rodney Glassman, Republican: Only major PAC donation came from the Arizonans For Stronger Universities PAC ($5,000).

Sandra Kennedy, Democrat: Clean Elections candidate.

Justin Olson, Republican: Only major PAC donation came from the Safeguarding American Liberties Morals & Opportunities Now PAC, run by former Congressman Matt Salmon ($1,000).

Kianna Sears, Democrat: Clean Elections candidate.

Jerod MacDonald-Evoy
Reporter Jerod MacDonald-Evoy joins the Arizona Mirror from the Arizona Republic, where he spent 4 years covering everything from dark money in politics to Catholic priest sexual abuse scandals. Jerod has also won awards for his documentary films which have covered issues such as religious tolerance and surveillance technology used by police. He brings strong watchdog sensibilities and creative storytelling skills to the Arizona Mirror.

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